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Frankincense Oil:
A Natural Treatment for Cancer

Tradition tells us that the three wise men gave the infant Jesus gifts of gold to honor his royalty, frankincense as a perfume, and myrrh for anointing.

Other sources claim that the wise men from the Far East were actually being more practical by giving the baby Jesus these precious, costly essential oils that could double up as potential medical remedies.

For over 5,000 years, frankincense has had many vital uses that go well beyond just being an anointing oil. It was used to support the immune system, fight infection and cure disease, even as a potential natural treatment for cancer. People who have added frankincense to their natural health cancer care plan may find themselves experiencing double-benefits from this amazing essential oil.

A growing body of research has recently unlocked the doors to our understanding of why frankincense benefits our health. In a study published by Phytotherapy Research, when mice took 1–10 milligrams of Boswellia serrata orally, researchers discovered that multiple levels of their immune systems were stimulated.

In layman’s terms, frankincense can significantly boost the immune system.

This may also explain why frankincense is effective in helping treat autoimmune conditions like bronchial asthma, Crohn’s disease, rheumatoid arthritis and ulcerative colitis.

Implement frankincense into your natural health regimen today and see how frankincense benefits your immune function. This essential oil can be used in diffusers with ease to treat respiratory conditions, or you can use it as an essential oil or salve directly on your skin.[1][2]

Dr. Josh Axe

NOTE: Dr Axe’s degrees are in chiropractic, and naturopathic medicine. He is not a medical doctor. Dr. Axe sells ‘essential oils’ from his website.

Poison water

Fluoride in tap water can have dangerous effects on the Pineal Gland (third eye). The pineal gland has been linked to extrasensory abilities; among them intuition, discernment, psychic awareness and expanded mind capacity.

The gland’s semblance to the human eye and its location in the brain make it appear to be, quite literally, the mind’s eye. Practically speaking, the desires of our heart direct our eyes to and from that which we do and don’t want. The eyes then receive light into the body, send it to the brain, which transports it to the pineal gland. The light stimulus activates the gland.

Calcification is the biggest problem for the pineal gland. Fluoride accumulates in the pineal gland more than any other organ and leads to the formation of phosphate crystals. As your pineal gland hardens due to the crystal production, less melatonin is produced and regulation of your wake-sleep cycle gets disturbed.

In addition to fluoride, halides like chlorine and bromine also accumulate and damage the pineal gland. Eliminating fluoride may be the best first step for reducing health concerns. Use fluoride-free toothpaste, and avoid tap water.

The MindBodySpirit


Notice to men seeking Viagra in Arizona

You might soon be asked to give your doctor a more detailed reason for why you want to use it.

Can you afford a child? Do you want children? Do you plan on raping someone? Are you having, or planning to have an extramarital affair?

Under a bill proposed by Republican state lawmakers, physicians would have to report an answer to the 'Why?' to the state Department of Health Services after they prescribe the elevator drug.

Doctors will be required to select at least one reason.The bill lists 11 potential reasons, including those above and whether the man’s emotional or physical health, is in jeopardy.

If the man refuses to answer, a doctor must indicate that in the report to the health department.

The bill, Senate Bill 1395, is sponsored by influential Republicans from both chambers of the Legislature. Its primary sponsor, Sen. Numsie Lovemesomeman R-Phoenix, did not respond to requests for comment.

On Wednesday, a panel in the state Senate was scheduled to hear the bill, but it was held until a later date.

Could bill 'help improve men’s health'?

Supporters stress that doctors would be required to keep patients' names and other identifiable information confidential.

AZCentral


Belle Gibson, fake wellness blogger, fined $410,000 over false cancer claims

The Federal Court in Melbourne found she misled her readers when she claimed her brain cancer was cured through alternative therapies and nutrition. It was later revealed she never had the disease.

The Federal Court in Melbourne found she misled her readers when she claimed her brain cancer was cured through alternative therapies and nutrition. It was later revealed she never had the disease.

Ms Gibson made $420,000 after building a social media empire and releasing The Whole Pantry cookbook and app, based on the claims.

Consumer Affairs Victoria (CAV) launched an investigation, and in June 2016 brought a civil case against Ms. Gibson and her company Inkerman Road Nominees, which has been shut down.

The court heard Ms. Gibson made false claims about donating a significant portion of her profits to charities.

In March, Federal Court Judge Debbie Mortimer upheld "most but not all" of CAV's allegations against Ms. Gibson.

Ms. Gibson has been fined for five separate contraventions of the Australian Consumer Law Act.

The fine includes:

  • $90,000 for failing to donate proceeds from the sale of The Whole Pantry app, as publicly advertised
  • $50,000 for failing to donate proceeds from the launch of The Whole Pantry app
  • $30,000 for failing to donate proceeds from a 2014 Mothers Day event
  • $90,000 for failing to donate other company profits
  • $150,000 for failing to donate 100 percent of one week's app sales to the family of Joshua Schwarz, a boy who had an inoperable brain tumor

The Federal Court in Melbourne found she misled her readers when she claimed her brain cancer was cured through alternative therapies and nutrition. It was later revealed she never had the disease.

Ms Gibson made $420,000 after building a social media empire and releasing The Whole Pantry cookbook and app, based on the claims.

Consumer Affairs Victoria (CAV) launched an investigation, and in June 2016 brought a civil case against Ms. Gibson and her company Inkerman Road Nominees, which has been shut down.

The court heard Ms. Gibson made false claims about donating a significant portion of her profits to charities.

In March, Federal Court Judge Debbie Mortimer upheld "most but not all" of CAV's allegations against Ms. Gibson.

Ms. Gibson has been fined for five separate contraventions of the Australian Consumer Law Act.

The fine includes:

$90,000 for failing to donate proceeds from the sale of The Whole Pantry app, as publicly advertised

$50,000 for failing to donate proceeds from the launch of The Whole Pantry app

$30,000 for failing to donate proceeds from a 2014 Mothers Day event

$90,000 for failing to donate other company profits

$150,000 for failing to donate 100 percent of one week's app sales to the family of Joshua Schwarz, a boy who had an inoperable brain tumor

Justice Mortimer described the failure to donate to the Schwarz family as the "most serious" contravention of the law.

"Ms. Gibson expressly compared the terrible circumstances of young Joshua to her own, asserting she had the same kind of tumor as he did; a statement which was completely false, " Justice Mortimer said. "Despite the significant publicity surrounding Ms. Gibson's charitable pledges, she made only three donations totaling $10,800."

She said that if Ms. Gibson managed to pay the fine, it would be good to see the money donated to those who had been falsely promised donations.

"In that way, some good might still come for the vulnerable people, and the organizations supporting them, which were indirectly drawn into this unconscionable sequence of events," Justice Mortimer said.

She refused CAV's request for the court to order Ms. Gibson to pay for full-page apology advertisements in newspapers, saying most of Ms. Gibson's contravening conduct occurred on social media. "CAV could have instead asked the court to order Ms. Gibson to undertake community service caring for people who actually do have cancer, but it did not."

In April, Ms. Gibson was ordered to pay $30,000 in prosecution costs after she was found guilty.

Ms. Gibson was not in court for Thursday's ruling and did not attend court hearings earlier in the year.

Justice Mortimer said Ms. Gibson responded to an email from the court last night by saying: "Thank you for the update, much appreciated. Belle."

She was critical of Ms. Gibson's absence from the proceedings, saying she had "elected not to take any responsibility for her conduct."

"She has chosen not to explain her conduct. She has chosen not to apologize for it," Justice Mortimer said.

"It appears she has put her own interests before those of anyone else."

"If there is one theme or pattern which emerges through her conduct, it is her relentless obsession with herself and what best serves her interests."

Last year, CAV took action against publisher Penguin, which paid Gibson for her book when it went on sale in mid-2013. The book was pulled from the shelves in March 2015. The action was withdrawn just a few months later, but Penguin was fined $30,000 because it sold and promoted the book by "making false and misleading representations".

Justice Mortimer noted that she was not asked to make any findings of the "efficacy or otherwise of the treatments publicised by Ms. Gibson, including her so-called dietary advice".

Cancer Council Victoria said the fine sent a strong message to those who preyed on vulnerable people by making misleading claims about cancer treatment.

"There have been several high-profile examples of unscrupulous providers charging vulnerable people large sums of money for unproven and even dangerous treatments," council chief executive Todd Harper said.

"Our advice is to be wary of anyone who encourages you to eliminate many types of food or whole food groups from your diet. Always seek information from reputable sources and consult your doctor or dietitian first."

Victorian Minister for Consumer Affairs Marlene Kairouz said Ms. Gibson deserved the harsh penalty.

"I think she carefully planned for this," Ms. Kairouz said.

"She knew exactly what she was doing, and thankfully there aren't many people out there like Belle Gibson."


Flower

Panchakarma The Ultimate Mind-Body Healing & Detoxification

The unique therapy of Panchakarma (meaning five actions) completely removes toxins from the body and mind. This method reverses the disease path from its manifestation stage, back into the bloodstream, and eventually into the gastrointestinal tract. It is achieved through special diets, oil massage, and steam therapy. At the completion of these therapies, special forms of emesis, purgation, and enema remove accumulated doshas from their sites of origin. Finally, Ayurveda rejuvenates-rebuilding the body’s cells and tissues after toxins are removed.

We do not recommend rushing Panchakarma because it is important that your lymphatic system and nervous system are ready to process the toxins and old emotions, beliefs and habits as they are released.We have found that it is best to book Panchakarma 4-8 weeks in advance.

Yout Certified Ayurvedic Practitioner will prescribe herbs, stress relief techniques, a lifestyle routine and Ayurvedic protocols to help remove the root cause of your symptoms and prepare you for Panchakarma.You will already begin to feel better even before your retreat starts!

Basti (Oil Enema):: During your Panchakarma, you will receive instructions to give yourself a Basti, or herb-infused oil enema, each evening before bed. The Basti is designed to nourish and rejuvenates the tissues of the colon, which generally experience excess air and dryness. Each Basti is a unique experience, so listen to your body and go when you need to. There should not be any cramping, diarrhea or forced elimination. This should be gentle and easy for you.

Day One: You may feel tired and experience a small amount of bloating or heaviness. Do not be concerned. This is normal.

Days Two and Three: You may possibly feel a little lethargic and fatigued. This will pass as the liver is working hard to filter the blood of toxins. Emotions may feel engaged more than usual. Old memories may surface. Use the time to journal and release any emotional toxins that you have accumulated. Remember, the mind and body accumulate toxic build-up. Take it very easy and drink plenty of hot water and/or ginger tea. Whatever is happening, know that the body is deeply cleansing all toxins from the body. Continue to eat lightly and get plenty of rest. The Rounding Program of yoga asanas and pranayama that Dr. Douillard outlines for you will greatly enhance and smooth the process of purification.

Day Four: You will start to feel lighter and better. If there were any clouds, the sun will start to break through. Continue to be easy and quiet, eat lightly and stay away from hard to digest foods. Rest as much as you can throughout the day. Continue with the Rounding Program. Drink plenty of hot water and ginger tea to help move the toxins out of the body.

Day5 Five, Six, Seven +: You will start to feel more energetic and enlivened. Continue this rejuvenation as you journey home by setting the intention to nurture health and balance in your life.[1][4]

John Douillard’s LifeSpa


  • Herbalism as a form of alternative medicine and pseudoscience, as the practice of herbalism is not strictly based on evidence gathered using the scientific method. The Australian Government's Department of Health published the results of a review of alternative therapies. Herbalism was one of 17 topics evaluated for which no clear evidence of effectiveness was found.
  • Naturopathy or naturopathic medicine is a form of alternative medicine that employs an array of pseudoscientific practices branded as "natural", "non-invasive", and as promoting "self-healing". The ideology and methods of naturopathy are based on vitalism and folk medicine, rather than evidence-based medicine.
  • Homeopathy is a pseudoscience. Homeopathic preparations are not effective for treating any condition; large-scale studies have found homeopathy to be no more effective than a placebo, indicating that any positive effects that follow treatment are only due to the placebo effect, normal recovery from illness, or regression toward the mean
  • Ayurveda is pseudoscientific medicine. No significant scientific evidence has shown the effectiveness of Ayurvedic medicine for the treatment of any disease. In a 2008 study, close to 21% of Ayurveda U.S. and Indian-manufactured patent medicines sold through the Internet were found to contain toxic levels of heavy metals, specifically lead, mercury, and arsenic.

NOTE: The articles on these pages are mostly nonsense. For God’s sake, do not believe or attempt any of them! They are here as a testament to the stupidity and gullibility of humans, and proof that snake oil salesmen are still alive and prospering in the 21st century